Sequels and Spin-offs: 11 ways to re-live Pride and Prejudice.

The very first published piece of Pride and Prejudice fan fiction, which I suspect may have been the first of any fan fiction, was a book called Old Friends and New Fancies by Sybil Brinton. Having no small number of Pride and Prejudice spin-offs on my own shelves, I had a notion of collating a list. Holy Moly, I had no idea how many were out there! A girl could spend her entire life reading nothing else. Darcy and Elizabeth grow old, or don’t, have two sons, have five daughters, have affairs with Bingley and Charlotte respectively (yes, in that order), battle zombies, are transformed into Antipodean animals, and, most horrifying of all, agree to take part in a reality TV show.

My girl reading Pride and Prejudice.

Meanwhile, my lovely twelve-year-old daughter has been reading the real thing. She ran upstairs last night to tell me, through the bathroom door (why must big announcements always be made through the bathroom door), that she had finished it.

‘It was so exciting! At the end! It all happened so fast! After all the long stories! With Wickham and everything! And then Jane and Bingley! And then Elizabeth and Darcy! It was like wham, wham, wham, The End! But what will I read now?’

Like thousands before her…

Eldest daughter helped me design a solution to finding your ideal dose of Darcy. For rapid reviews of these books, click hereSequels and Spin-offs to Pride and Prejudice.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

10 thoughts on “Sequels and Spin-offs: 11 ways to re-live Pride and Prejudice.

  1. The flow chart you and your daughter cooked up made me laugh, Lynda. I have one to add: “Working class or gentry?” with Jo Baker’s Longbourn following the working class arrow. (I am actually a bit hesitant to mention this one, as so many Goodreads reviewers (notably the Austen purists) did not like it at all (or even hated it!). I thought it was a fairly good read (3 stars?), but that’s likely because my sympathies do align more with the stories found downstairs.)

    “But what will I read now?” Oh, it’s so hard to come to the end of a good book — it’s a bittersweet loss that can take days or weeks to recover from.

    Like

    1. I’m feeling very guilty because I DID read Longbourn and enjoyed it. I loaned out the book and didn’t get it back and couldn’t justify buying it again. I planned on relying on memory and then just plain forgot about it. The Goodreads reviews are very harsh. It’s a decent book.

      Like

      1. I don’t think you should feel guilty — it’s impossible to keep track of everything, and besides, it’s occurred to me that the central characters in P&P are really so much on the periphery of Jo Baker’s book that they could (essentially) just as easily have been ANYONE, which does rather put this book on the very fringe of P&P spin-offs.
        I confess I’m relieved to find that you actually liked Longbourn as well!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I love that the most important thoughts from our kids are always through the bathroom door….just shows you that no matter, we are always available to them…LOL great book she should be proud to have finished it…LOL hope your enjoying summer….hotter than hatties here….xxkat

    Like

  3. Oh dear I should have ‘clicked here’ before going to the local church fete yesterday afternoon as ‘Pride and Prejudice and Zombies’ came home with me! (30p a book or 4 for £1 how could I resist and there were some lovely 1960s Penguin editions of titles I really should have read by now like ‘To the Lighthouse’). I might give it a try with the summer holidays coming up. On a later post – I love that your blog is a mash up of different interests. I am very fond of the Domestic Arts and family takes up the majority of my life but having read Literature for my degree all those years ago I so appreciate your book reviews. Mrs Miniver’s daughter similarly feeds my soul……xx

    Like

Let me know that I'm not talking to the wall...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s